Teachers/Poems

For teachers and students everywhere! These three Earthcube designs have poems (complete or excerpted) displayed on each of the four panels, halfway down the cube. This is a fun way to learn some terrific poems by famous writers:

The Sea Spirit by Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942)

The Brook by Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892)

Daffodils by William Wordsworth (1770-1850)


NOT STICKY 3.5” Sea Spirit Note CubeNOT STICKY 3.5” Sea Spirit Note Cube Alt
Ocean Poem Note Cube 3.5″x3.5″x3.5″not sticky, poem, blank pages

Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942) was the Canadian author of the beloved novel Anne of Green Gables. She was a prolific writer, penning under the name L.M. Montgomery — publishing more than 20 novels, 530 short stories, 500 poems, an autobiography, and 30 essays. In recognition of her work, she was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1935, and Canada named her a National Historic Person in 1943. Montgomery’s mystical poem The Sea Spirit was first published in 1902.

NOT STICKY 3.5” The Brook (Tennyson POEM) Note CubeNOT STICKY 3.5” The Brook (Tennyson POEM) Note Cube Alternate
The Brook Note Cube 3.5″x3.5″x3.5″not sticky, poem, blank pages

Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892), who is among the most popular and beloved of British poets, was Poet Laureate during Great Britain’s Victorian era following the death of William Wordsworth. He wrote and published poetry from his teens into his eighties. The Brook epitomizes his signature lyrical sound and cadence, and since his poetry is often quoted, excerpts occur frequently in popular culture. The Brook is excerpted on the side panels of the Dances with the Daffodils note cube: stanzas 1, 2, 4, and 3 (of 13).

NOT STICKY 3.5” Dances with the Daffodils (Wordsworth POEM) Note CubeNOT STICKY 3.5” Dances with the Daffodils (Wordsworth POEM) Note Cube Alternate
Unavailable (being redesigned) – Dances with the Daffodils Note Cube 3.5″x3.5″x3.5″not sticky, poem, blank pages

William Wordsworth was a major English poet (and Poet Laureate) credited with helping to launch the Romantic Age in English literature. Wordsworth’s Daffodils is a famous and beloved poem, inspired by his sister Dorothy’s journal entry after a walk they took around Glencoyne Bay in England’s Lake District in April 1802. They’d come upon daffodils along the shore, sprung from wind-blown seeds. “When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.”